Things I would guess

There are things, I would guess,
We can afford to let wait.
Maybe a bill goes a little late,
Or we don’t say yes to all the plans.
Just maybe we know what’s going on;
Know that most of our chances are gone;
Gone right out of our hands.
There are things that can wait
But our hour isn’t one.
When everything’s said and done,
Maybe we’ll burn down the State.

-PWC

Glossolalia: a broken sonnet form

The words to speak the truth are hard to find
When there’s a space between the symbol
and the sign which it is trying to describe.
The signifier doesn’t show the sign.

What words we have will break beyond repair.
What words we have will fall down to the ground.
And me, a man of unclean lips, I’ll praise
And raise my broken words into the air

But who would lend an ear to hear the sound
Of shattered voices scattered by the wind
That sends them faltering in harmony
Into the air—into the sky to drown?

We try to speak aloud but fail each day.
Our empty words will only fade away.

 

Hey, it’s national poetry month. Take a break and read a poem!

-PWC

National Poetry Month 2019

Milosz

April is National Poetry Month, and this year I’m trying to write a little more. Of course, you can’t really write poetry without reading some of it, so I’ve also been revisiting an old favorite of mine: Czesław Miłosz.

Miłosz is a Nobel Prize-winning poet, originally from Poland, who survived the events of the second world war. A lot of his poetry deals with themes of morality and faith, but having seen the rise of 20th century totalitarian regimes, his work also deals with history and politics. Overall, he’s a complex writer, but one that’s well worth the read.

If you’re looking for something to read for this year’s poetry month, The Poetry Foundation has a few of his poems on their website. I’d also highly recommend the book that I used as the cover image on this post. Miłosz has a lot of great work, and pretty much all of it is worth reading.

Just a fair warning: if you’re looking for a cheerier read, you’ll probably want to look elsewhere. Miłosz saw a lot of the worst things that happened in the 20th century, and he spent a good portion of his life in exile from his own country. The government of Poland even banned his writing for several years. His work is definitely a little more on the grim side of poetry, but if that’s your thing, you’ll probably appreciate his work.

Happy National Poetry Month!

-PWC

National poetry month 2018

It’s the middle of National Poetry Month, and, if you’re like me, that means you’ve been reading a whole lot of poetry. Of course, this isn’t necessarily a new thing for me. I’m usually reading a whole lot of poetry; however, I had a thought a while I was in the middle of this poetry cram: perhaps instead of trying to get as much poetry into my day as I possibly could, it might be a good idea to take a deeper dive into a single poem. To that end, starting this second half of National Poetry Month, I’ve decided to try to actually memorize an entire piece. While I’m doing this, I also thought I would make a bit of a case for memorization as opposed to cramming when it comes to poetry.

First, poetry is not the same genre as prose, and because of this, it requires a different reading tactic. If you sit down with a good book, you could easily keep reading forward for hours and get the gist of the story. Poetry doesn’t work that way. A lot of the time, reading a poem requires more than one read in order to really understand what the piece is going for, and even after two readings, there are still going to be things that get missed along the way. Basically, a poem invites the reader to take things a little slower and really appreciate what the words and the language are doing. The best way to see what a writer was going for with the language (especially if you can’t hear them actually reading the piece) is to memorize it. This doesn’t put the poem in your own words, but it does put it in your own voice and allows you to get at that deep appreciation of how the words are being used.

Another thing to consider is ownership. No, you won’t ever completely own a poem unless you’ve written one yourself and never show it to anyone else; however, with memorization, there’s a way that you let a piece become a part of you: a piece of the way that your mind works. If you have some poetry memorized, lines will come into your head, sometimes when they aren’t appropriate, but more often than not when they are completely applicable to whatever your situation happens to be. Further, a memorized poem can’t be taken away from you. Your book might get lost, stolen, left on a bus, etc., but if you have something committed to memory, the book doesn’t matter as much. The piece that you know will always be with you.

There are some other benefits as well: memorization is also good for your cognitive functioning, and the more you do it the easier it gets to do. While those are good to know, I think they’re mostly just gravy. All the good stuff is the experience of the poem that you can really only get through memorization.

Memorization is a long and difficult process, and it can be fairly hard to do. That being said, I’d still suggest giving it a try. It’s, arguably, the best way to enjoy a poem, and the best way to really understand a piece. If you’re thinking of committing something to memory for National Poetry Month, I have two pieces of advice: start with something small, and start with something that rhymes. Sonnets are great for this. Fourteen lines and a really regular rhyme scheme make memorization really easy, so if this is something you want to try, that’s where I would suggest starting.

Happy National Poetry Month!

-PWC